Tag: Genetics + Genomics

Human Y chromosome stays intact while chimp Y loses genes

August 31, 2005

The human and the chimpanzee Y chromosomes went their separate ways approximately 6 million years ago. But ever since this evolutionary parting, these two chromosomes have experienced different fates, ne research indicates.

Study yields insights into pathogenic fungi—and beer

August 8, 2005

Chemotherapy or organ transplantation not only take a huge toll on patients, but they can compromise the immune system and leave patients vulnerable to infections from microbes such as pathogenic fungi—the fastest-growing cause of hospital-acquired infections.

Image: Microarry results

Array for the cell

May 25, 2005

Figuring what a gene does is hard work, but it’s vastly easier than it was a few years ago. Back then, you would laboriously isolate a single gene, tinker with it to get some inkling about its purpose, and then start speculating about how it might collaborate with other genes. Now, microarrays let researchers gather exponentially more data about gene expression.

Image: Artwork of monkey and rat surrounded by base pairs

The genome club

January 12, 2005

A growing list of mammals is joining humans, mice, and chimpanzees in the exclusive club of those whose whole genome has been sequenced—giving complete and matching sets of each animal's DNA, and offering researchers the opportunity to rebuild biology and medicine from the ground up.

Image: Haplotype map of a portion of chromosome 5

Of peas and patterns

January 5, 2005

In the 19th century, mathematical formulas didn’t figure much into biology. But when Austrian monk Gregor Mendel crossed and counted his round and wrinkled peas, he found something unexpected: a pattern.

Battle over biodefense

December 1, 2004

As the U.S. pumps billions into research on everything from anthrax and plague to military biohazard suits, what's the effect on our science—and our security?

Role models

October 6, 2004

When genes work, they stick around. And so do many of the biological processes they create. As Whitehead Member Hazel Sive put it, kicking off Whitehead Symposium XXII—Disease, Development and Darwin—the process of evolution “conserves circuitry.”

Researchers identify the genome’s controlling elements

September 1, 2004

Using yeast as a testing ground, Whitehead researchers have for the first time revealed all the “controlling elements” of an entire genome—findings that may soon contribute to a new way of understanding human health and disease.

The big picture

July 14, 2004

For years, scientists have studied the human genome one gene at a time. Today, their view is more global, a vantage point that offers a new look at how genes and proteins work together to produce living cells and organisms.

Branching out

April 14, 2004

Whitehead biologist Steve Rozen has explored the family tree of the male-determing Y chromosome, looking for information about a genetic mutation that raises interesting questions about the evolution of the Y.

Study examines how cells tell each other apart

March 24, 2004

The idea of self vs. nonself may sound more like an existential identity crisis than a question in cellular biology. But to Whitehead Institute Associate Member Andrew Chess, the concept could offer information about how cells tell each other apart, a cellular self-awareness that ensures the correct wiring of neurons in the brain.

Study answers questions on ancestry of yeast genome

March 8, 2004

In work that may lead to a better understanding of genetic diseases, researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT, Harvard University and Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research show that baker’s yeast was created hundreds of millions of years ago when its ancestor temporarily became a kind of super-organism with twice the usual number of chromosomes and increased potential to evolve.

Pages

© Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research              455 Main Street          Cambridge, MA 02142