News + Publications

Diagram of pseudouridylation of mRNA

September 15, 2014

Scientists discover RNA modifications in some unexpected places

Deploying sophisticated high-throughput sequencing technology, dubbed ψ-seq, a team of Whitehead Institute and Broad Institute researchers collaborated on a comprehensive, high-resolution mapping of ψ sites that confirms pseudouridylation, the most common post-transcriptional modification, does indeed occur naturally in mRNA.

Diagram of reprogramming factors in SNEL

September 4, 2014

New reprogramming factor cocktail produces therapy-grade induced pluripotent stem cells

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) may hold the potential to cure damaged nerves, regrow limbs and organs, and perfectly model a patient’s particular disease. Yet these cells can acquire serious genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that lower the cells’ quality and limit their therapeutic usefulness. Now Whitehead Institute researchers have identified a cocktail of reprogramming factors that produces very high quality iPSCs.

Images of tissue sections from breast cancer patient biopsies

July 31, 2014

Master heat-shock factor supports reprogramming of normal cells to enable tumor growth and metastasis

Long associated with enabling the proliferation of cancer cells, the ancient cellular survival response regulated by Heat-Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) can also turn neighboring cells in their environment into co-conspirators that support malignant progression and metastasis.

Image of iPipet

July 30, 2014

Innovative scientists update old-school pipetting with new-age technology

A team of Whitehead Institute researchers is bringing new levels of efficiency and accuracy to one of the most essential albeit tedious tasks of bench science: pipetting.

Phase and fluorescence images of conventional (primed) human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and naïve human ESCs

July 24, 2014

Whitehead Institute researchers create “naïve” pluripotent human embryonic stem cells

Embryonic stem cell (ESC) research has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are “primed” and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells. Now researchers in the lab of Whitehead Institute Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch have discovered how to manipulate and maintain human ESCs into a “naïve” or base pluripotent state similar to that of mouse ESCs without the use of any reprogramming factors.

Paradigm Magazine


PDF

Past Issues

2012 Annual Report


PDF

Annual Report Archives

© Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research         Nine Cambridge Center    Cambridge, MA 02142