News + Publications

Images of tissue sections from breast cancer patient biopsies

July 31, 2014

Master heat-shock factor supports reprogramming of normal cells to enable tumor growth and metastasis

Long associated with enabling the proliferation of cancer cells, the ancient cellular survival response regulated by Heat-Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) can also turn neighboring cells in their environment into co-conspirators that support malignant progression and metastasis.

Image of iPipet

July 30, 2014

Innovative scientists update old-school pipetting with new-age technology

A team of Whitehead Institute researchers is bringing new levels of efficiency and accuracy to one of the most essential albeit tedious tasks of bench science: pipetting.

Phase and fluorescence images of conventional (primed) human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and naïve human ESCs

July 24, 2014

Whitehead Institute researchers create “naïve” pluripotent human embryonic stem cells

Embryonic stem cell (ESC) research has been hampered by the inability to transfer research and tools from mouse ESC studies to their human counterparts, in part because human ESCs are “primed” and slightly less plastic than the mouse cells. Now researchers in the lab of Whitehead Institute Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch have discovered how to manipulate and maintain human ESCs into a “naïve” or base pluripotent state similar to that of mouse ESCs without the use of any reprogramming factors.

Images of cells with normal and abnormal CENP-A deposition

July 17, 2014

Faithful cell division requires tightly controlled protein placement at the centromeres

The protein CENP-A, which is integrated into human DNA at the centromere on each chromosome, has a vital role in cell division. Work from Whitehead Institute Member Iain Cheeseman’s lab describes how the vital and tightly controlled replenishment of CENP-A progresses.

Implanting beads coated with Bradykinin peptides prevents the abnormal facial phenotypes seen after loss of function in kininogen, part of the Kinin-Kallikreien pathway.

July 17, 2014

A region and pathway found crucial for facial development in vertebrate embryos

A signaling pathway once thought to have little if any role during embryogenesis is a key player in the formation of the front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos. Moreover, signals emanating from this region—referred to as the “extreme anterior domain” (EAD)—orchestrate the complex choreography that gives rise to proper facial structure.

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