News + Publications

Images of yeast inside macrophages that have not and have been treated with Inz-5

August 11, 2016

Disrupting mitochondrial function could improve treatment of fungal infections

By identifying new compounds that selectively block mitochondrial respiration in pathogenic fungi, Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a potential antifungal mechanism that could enable combination therapy with fluconazole, one of today’s most commonly prescribed fungal infection treatments. Severe, invasive fungal infections have a mortality rate of 30-50% and cause an estimated 1.5 million deaths worldwide annually. Current antifungal therapies are hampered by the increasingly frequent emergence of drug resistance and negative interactions that often preclude combination use.

Whitehead Member Susan Lindquist

August 3, 2016

Whitehead’s Susan Lindquist to receive prestigious Albany Prize in Medicine

Whitehead Institute Member Susan Lindquist has been named one of three recipients of the Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research for 2016.

August 2, 2016

Jaw-dropping research explains mouth formation during embryonic development

Whitehead Institute researchers have identified an area in the developing face of embryonic frogs that unzips to form the mouth. The scientists, who named this region the “pre-mouth array”, have also discovered the cellular signaling that triggers its formation. Elucidating this critical aspect of craniofacial development in a model organism enhances understanding of and potential treatment for human facial birth defects.

Whitehead Member Jing-Ke Weng

July 18, 2016

Whitehead’s Jing-Ke Weng receives 2016 Beckman Young Investigator Award

Whitehead Member Jing-Ke Weng is one of eight early-career scientists nationwide to be named a 2016 Beckman Young Investigator.

Graphical abstract of the research described below

July 14, 2016

Defining what it means to be a naive stem cell

Whitehead Institute scientists have created a checklist that defines the “naive” state of cultured human embryonic stem cells (ESCs).  Such cells provide a better model of early human embryogenesis than conventional ESCs in later stages of development.

Paradigm Magazine


PDF

Past Issues

2014 Annual Report


PDF

Annual Report Archives

© Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research         Nine Cambridge Center    Cambridge, MA 02142