Tag: Genetics + Genomics

Human embryonic stem cells and reprogrammed cells virtually identical

August 5, 2010

Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and adult cells reprogrammed to an embryonic stem cell-like state—so-called induced pluripotent stem or iPS cells—exhibit very few differences in their gene expression signatures and are nearly indistinguishable in their chromatin state, according to Whitehead Institute researchers.

How microtubules let go of their attachments during cell division

May 13, 2010

Whitehead Institute researchers have determined a key part of how cells regulate the chromosome/microtubule interface, which is central to proper chromosomal distribution during cell division.

Karyotype of cell with only one copy of each chromosome, except chromosome 8

Knockouts in human cells point to pathogenic targets

November 26, 2009

Whitehead Institute researchers have developed a new approach for genetics in human cells and used this technique to identify specific genes and proteins required for pathogens.

Study reveals connection between genetic and environmental causes of Parkinson’s disease

February 1, 2009

Scientists at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have found that a single gene, known as PARK9, protects cells from manganese toxicity and rescues neurons from over-expression of the protein alpha-synuclein. Misfolded alpha-synuclein is the hallmark of Parkinson’s disease.

Tracking the molecular pathway to mixed-lineage leukemia

December 15, 2008

The MLL-AF4 fusion protein, which causes the blood cancer called mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), binds to several genes responsible for early blood cell development. MLL-AF4 also alters the chromatin proteins associated with these genes, a state that is associated with cancer and leukemia progression.

DNA methylation shown to promote development of colon tumors

December 1, 2007

A promising pathway that may lead to prevention, diagnosis and treatment of certain cancers with minimal side effects.

Whitehead postdoctoral researchers Stuart Levine and Matthew Guenther

Cells take risks with their identities

July 12, 2007

Contrary to textbook models, many genes that should be “off” in embryonic stem cells and specialized adult cells remain primed to produce master regulatory proteins, leaving those cells vulnerable to identity changes.

MIT Professors Linda Griffith, Leona Samson, and Harvey Lodish in the lab with their advisee Joe Shuga

DNA-damage test could aid drug development

May 14, 2007

Researchers have developed a cell culture test for assessing a compound’s genetic toxicity that may prove dramatically cheaper than existing animal tests.

Schematic of identifying Foxp3 interacts with the genome

Cracking open the black box of autoimmune disease

January 21, 2007

Researchers have identified a key set of genes that lie at the core of autoimmune disease.

Andreas Hochwagen joins Whitehead Fellows program

May 15, 2006

He will study cell division, particularly meiosis.

Mapping the foundation of human development

April 20, 2006

Researchers have determined how a key developmental ingredient controls the genome.

Human Y chromosome stays intact while chimp Y loses genes

August 31, 2005

The human and the chimpanzee Y chromosomes went their separate ways approximately 6 million years ago. But ever since this evolutionary parting, these two chromosomes have experienced different fates, ne research indicates.

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