Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

When More is Better

Most cells in the body have two copies of each chromosome. But some cells,
including the sub-perineurial glia cells (nuclei labeled green) encasing this larval fruit fly brain
lobe, have an increase in DNA copy number. By studying cells like these, Whitehead Member
Terry Orr-Weaver investigates how and why cells increase or decrease copies of their DNA.

A scientific community exploring biology's most fundamental questions for the betterment of human health

Bartel Lab: Exploring small RNAs that regulate gene expression

Cheeseman Lab: Examining the kinetochore’s role in chromosome segregation and cell division

Fink Lab: Identifying the function of genes involved in intractable fungal infections

Gehring Lab: Studying epigenomic reprogramming during plant reproduction

Gupta Lab: Studying mechanisms that control cellular diversity in normal and cancerous tissues

Jaenisch Lab: Pursuing patient-specific pluripotent cells with which to study complex human diseases

Lindquist Lab: Exploring the ways protein folding determines an organism’s biological properties

Lodish Lab: Elucidating the mechanisms and modulators of red blood cell development

Orr-Weaver Lab: Studying DNA replication, chromosome segregation, and meiosis in the context of organismal development

Page Lab: Shedding new light on sex chromosome biology and evolution, the fetal origins of gametes, and infertility

Ploegh Lab: Elucidating the immune system’s response to invading viruses and bacteria

Reddien Lab: Investigating the cellular and molecular basis for regeneration

Sabatini Lab: Investigating the complex roles nutrients, cell growth, and metabolism play in aging and disease

Sive Lab: Using zebrafish to study vertebrate brain development and the genetic basis of human mental health disorders

Weinberg Lab: Deciphering the drivers of cancer cell invasion and metastasis

Weng Lab: Studying plant metabolism and its link to complex disease biology

Young Lab: Mapping the regulatory circuitry that controls cell state and differentiation in mice and humans

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News

Implanting beads coated with Bradykinin peptides prevents the abnormal facial phenotypes seen after loss of function in kininogen, part of the Kinin-Kallikreien pathway.

July 17, 2014

A region and pathway found crucial for facial development in vertebrate embryos

A signaling pathway once thought to have little if any role during embryogenesis is a key player in the formation of the front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos. Moreover, signals emanating from this region—referred to as the “extreme anterior domain” (EAD)—orchestrate the complex choreography that gives rise to proper facial structure.

Featured

Spring 2014 Paradigm


Paradigm

The Spring 2014 issue of Paradigm reports on Whitehead Institute research, trends in the life sciences, and happenings in the Whitehead community.

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