Tag: Jaenisch Lab

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Researchers discover key to embryonic stem-cell potential

September 8, 2005

Researchers working with human embryonic stem cells have uncovered the process responsible for the single-most tantalizing characteristic of these cells: their ability to become just about any type of cell in the body, a trait known as pluripotency.

Image: Tissue samples from chimeric mice

Researchers discover mechanism for multiplying adult stem cells

May 5, 2005

Researchers in the lab of Whitehead Institute Member Rudolf Jaenisch have discovered a mechanism that might enable scientists to multiply adult stem cells quickly and efficiently.

Life, death and stem cells

November 10, 2004

Both sides of the debate on therapeutic cloning are fighting for life and against death. It's probably the only thing they have in common.

Konrad Hochedlinger awarded Genzyme Fellowship

October 20, 2004

Konrad Hochedlinger, a postdoctoral associate in the lab of Whitehead Member Rudolf Jaenisch, has been selected by a Whitehead committee to receive the Genzyme Postdoctoral Fellowship at Whitehead Institute.

Rett Syndrome Research Foundation commits funding to support Matthew Tudor

August 25, 2004

Matthew Tudor, postdoc in the lab of Whitehead Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch, is among 15 awardees of research and education suport from The Rett Syndrome Research Foundation (RSRF) for 2004.

Malignant cancer cells generate mice through cloning

August 8, 2004

Nature can reset the clock in certain types of cancer and reverse many of the elements responsible for causing malignancy, reports a research team led by Whitehead Institute Member Rudolf Jaenisch, in collaboration with Lynda Chin from Dana Farber Cancer Institute. The team demonstrated this by successfully cloning mice from an advanced melanoma cell.

Will the UN beat the ban?

July 7, 2004

For stem cell research, this was a “Who’s Who?” gathering. Those taking the stage at United Nations headquarters in New York included Whitehead Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch; Douglas Melton of Harvard University; Roslin Institute’s Ian Wilmut, the Scottish embryologist who cloned Dolly; and Seoul National University’s Shin Yong Moon, who culled embryonic stem cells from the cloned human blastocyst earlier this year.

Study confirms Rett syndrome begins in neurons

April 21, 2004

Scientists have known for some time that mutations in a gene named MeCP2 lead to Rett syndrome, a major cause of mental retardation in girls. Now, a Whitehead Institute research team has provided evidence for the long accepted, but previously unproven theory that Rett syndrome is caused by loss of MeCP2 exclusively in neurons.

Scientists clone mice from olfactory cells

February 15, 2004

Many scientists believe that the further a cell is from the embryonic stem cell stage, the harder it is to make a successful clone using that cell’s genetic material. Now, researchers at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have cloned mice using olfactory neurons – cells far removed from the embryonic state.

Study Offers New Insight into Rett Syndrome

October 30, 2003

Rett Syndrome is a major cause of mental retardation in girls. Although researchers have identified the protein involved in the disease, its exact role remains a mystery. Now, a group of researchers from Children’s Hospital Boston and Whitehead Institute have identified the protein’s function, a discovery the scientists say could be the first significant advance in Rett Syndrome research in years.

Faulty Reprogramming Likely Culprit behind Cloning Failures, Review Finds

July 16, 2003

Faulty reprogramming of the genome is most likely the culprit behind abnormalities common in cloned animals, according to a review article in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Jaenisch Named to National Academy of Sciences

April 29, 2003

Founding Whitehead Institute Member Rudolf Jaenisch is one of 72 new members of the National Academy of Sciences elected in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

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