Tag: Protein Function

Image of yeast cells epxressing alpha-synuclein

Researchers reverse Parkinson's symptoms in animal models

June 22, 2006

They repaired a key biological pathway, restoring normal neurological function.

Mad-cow protein aids creation of brain cells

February 13, 2006

The protein ultimately responsible for mad cow disease might be necessary for healthy brain function.

Mad-cow culprit maintains stem cells

January 30, 2006

The same protein that causes neurodegenerative conditions such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease) is also important for helping certain adult stem cells maintain themselves.

Novel mechanism for blood disease may lead to new drugs

December 20, 2005

Researchers have discovered an unusual mechanism underlying myeloproliferative disease.

Within the folds, outside the box

October 26, 2005

Feverishly hot climates. Dizzying alcohol and sugar binges. Heavy metals. Toxic drugs. Genetic mutations. Over the years, yeast, fruit flies, mustard plants and mice have struggled through their own versions of an extreme reality TV show in the laboratory of Whitehead Member Susan Lindquist.

Pathogenic fungi reveal new mechanism for evolution

September 29, 2005

Researchers in the laboratory of Whitehead Member Susan Lindquist have identified a key mechanism that enables pathogenic fungi to evolve drug-resistant capabilities with such distressing rapidity.

Image: Diagram of how insulin aids glucose absorption

Fat chance: the biology of obesity

June 22, 2005

Better understanding of fat-cell hormones will help us attack the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Harvey Lodish, a Founding Whitehead Member and professor of biology at MIT, has pioneered this field.

Image: Diagrams of protein fibers

Unweaving amyloid fibers to solve prion puzzles

June 8, 2005

Amyloid fibers are best known as the plaque that gunks up neurons in people with neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer’s and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease—the human analog of mad cow disease. But even though amyloids are common and implicated in a host of conditions, researchers haven’t been able to identify their precise molecular structures.

Image: Function of MEI-S332

When cells divide

April 27, 2005

Cells are dividing all the time, and that’s a good thing. If they didn’t, our tissue and organs couldn’t replenish themselves, and pretty soon we’d be done for. But when cell division goes wrong, it can have disastrous results, such as cancer and birth defects. Scientists in the lab of Whitehead Member Terry Orr-Weaver have uncovered one of the primary mechanisms governing cell division.

Researchers identify target for cancer drugs

February 14, 2005

For nearly a decade, scientists have been trying to fully understand a particular communication pathway inside of cells that contributes to many malignant brain and prostate cancers.

Faster drug screening

November 17, 2004

Finding molecules that can potentially be developed into therapies is a time-consuming, cumbersome process. Now, Whitehead scientists have developed a way to simplify the process so that a library of 5,000 molecular drug candidates can potentially be screened on a single slide.

Emerald City: How a jellyfish helped advance science

September 15, 2004

Salmon fishermen trolling along the waters off Puget Sound in Washington are often witness to an awesome sight when they haul in their catch: salmon captured in nets that glow brilliantly against the nighttime sky.

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