Tag: Jaenisch Lab

Illustration of person using a claw machine to pick out a drug candidate

Speeding up drug discovery for brain diseases

July 31, 2019

Whitehead Institute team finds drugs that activate a key brain gene; initial tests in cells and mice show promise for rare, untreatable neurodevelopmental disorder

Collage of images in regeneration piece: Planarians, liver cells, and stem cells

The science of self-repair: regeneration research at Whitehead Institute

June 17, 2019

Researchers at Whitehead Institute are uncovering the underlying genetics, mechanisms, and principles of regeneration. 

Representation of the Zika virus's surface

How to be a good host (for Zika virus)

April 22, 2019

Using a genome-wide CRISPR screen in neural progenitor cells, Whitehead Institute scientists uncover what the Zika virus needs to infect human cells

Photo of Postdoc Shawn Liu and Whitehead Institute Member Rudolf Jaensich with STAT logo

Whitehead Institute researchers win STAT's Editor's Pick award

April 8, 2019

Whitehead Institute Member Rudolf Jaenisch and Shawn Liu, a postdoc in his lab, were chosen for the honor by STAT staff

Illustration of a hand assembling a brain jigsaw puzzle

Only in your head

October 9, 2018

Researchers uncover how a ubiquitously expressed mutation causes a brain-specific disorder.

Astrocytes infected with Zika virus

Stem cell-derived Zika model suggests mechanisms underlying microcephaly

June 19, 2018

Infected microglia cells can ferry Zika virus to developing brain

Illustration of scientist looking at a neuron

Fragile X syndrome neurons restored using CRISPR/Cas9-guided activation strategy

February 15, 2018

Fragile X syndrome is the most frequent cause of intellectual disability in males, affecting 1 out of 3600 boys born. For the first time, researchers at Whitehead Institute have restored activity to the fragile X syndrome gene in affected neurons using a modified CRISPR/Cas9 system they developed.

Landon Clay, Lavinia Clay, and Charles Ellis in front of portrait of Edwin C. "Jack" Whitehead

In Memoriam: Landon T. Clay

July 31, 2017

The Whitehead Institute community has lost Landon Clay, a true friend and an avid supporter of the Institute’s scientific mission and research. 

Scientists engineer gene pathway to grow brain organoids with surface folding

January 3, 2017

Whitehead researchers provide insight into a specific gene pathway that appears to regulate the growth, structure, and organization of the human cortex. They also demonstrate that 3D human cerebral organoids--miniature, lab-grown versions of specific brain structures--can be effective in modeling the molecular, cellular, and anatomical processes of human brain development. And they suggest a new path for identifying the cells affected by Zika virus.

Still images of a microglia-like cell branching

Derived neural immune cells enable new facet of neurodegeneration research

September 26, 2016

Whitehead Institute scientists have devised a protocol for pushing human pluripotent stem cells to become microglia—the specialized immune cells that maintain the brain and care for it after injury. Microglia play an important role in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, and studying these cells has been very difficult until now.

Diagram of how editing methylation can change cells

Scientists use CRISPR/Cas9 to flip DNA methylation states in vivo

September 22, 2016

Whitehead Institute scientists have deciphered how to use a modified CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system to change genes’ methylation state, thereby activating or silencing those genes. Proper methylation is critical for normal cellular operations and altered methylation has been linked to many diseases, including neurological disorders and cancer.

Image of mouse cerebellum section with cells having different imprinted methylation

Inherited parental methylation shifts over time, may have functional effects in the brain and other tissues

September 20, 2016

Inherited methylation—a form of epigenetic regulation passed down from parents to offspring—is far more dynamic than previously thought and may contribute to changes in the brain and other tissues over time. This finding by Whitehead Institute scientists challenges current understandings of gene regulation via methylation, from development through adulthood.  

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