Tag: Fink Lab

Whitehead Founding Member Gerald Fink

Whitehead Institute Founding Member Gerald Fink Receives Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Killian Award

May 16, 2018

The award, which is among MIT’s highest honors, recognizes Fink’s standing as a scientist who has fundamentally changed the way researchers approach biological problems

Image of red and white yeast colonies

CRISPR-Cas genome editing of Candida albicans holds promise for overcoming deadly fungal infections

April 3, 2015

Candida albicans is a human pathogen that causes potentially lethal infections in immunocompromised individuals. Efforts to overcome Candida’s innate resistance to many drugs have been thwarted by an absence of tools enabling genetic modifications. Now, using a modified CRISPR-Cas system, Whitehead Institute researchers can edit the fungus’s genome systematically—an approach that could help scientists understand Candida’s unique biology and identify potential drug targets.

Image of yeast cells

Scientists develop novel approach to boost biofuel production

October 2, 2014

MIT and Whitehead Institute researchers have identified a new way to boost yeast tolerance to ethanol simply by altering the composition of the medium in which the yeast are grown. They believe this finding could have a significant impact on industrial biofuel production.

Diagram of pseudouridylation of mRNA

Scientists discover RNA modifications in some unexpected places

September 15, 2014

Deploying sophisticated high-throughput sequencing technology, dubbed ψ-seq, a team of Whitehead Institute and Broad Institute researchers collaborated on a comprehensive, high-resolution mapping of ψ sites that confirms pseudouridylation, the most common post-transcriptional modification, does indeed occur naturally in mRNA.

Model of mitochondrion

Engineering cells for more efficient biofuel production

February 17, 2013

Whitehead Institute and MIT chemical engineers and biologists have now devised a way to dramatically boost isobutanol production in yeast, which naturally make it in small amounts. They engineered yeast so that isobutanol synthesis takes place entirely within mitochondria, cell structures that generate energy and also host many biosynthetic pathways.

Whitehead Founding Member Gerald Fink

Whitehead Founding Member Gerald Fink announced as President-elect of AAAS

January 25, 2013

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today announced that Whitehead Institute Founding Member Gerald R. Fink has been chosen as its President-elect for 2013.

Noncoding RNAs alter yeast phenotypes in a site-specific manner

February 14, 2012

A team of scientists from Whitehead Institute and other institutions has shown for the first time how two long intergenic noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in brewer’s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) contribute to a location-dependent switch for the yeast FLO11 gene to toggle between active and inactive states.

Protein unmasks pathogenic fungi to activate immune response

August 8, 2011

Whitehead Institute researchers have uncovered a novel association between two fungal recognition receptors on the surface of certain immune cells, called macrophages.  The interaction of these receptors (dectin-1 and galectin-3) sheds new light on how the innate immune system discriminates between non-pathogenic and pathogenic fungi.

Gerald Fink awarded 2010 Gruber Genetics Prize

June 30, 2010

Whitehead Institute Founding Member Gerald Fink has been awarded the 2010 Genetics Prize of The Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation for his groundbreaking research in yeast genetics.

Schematic of neutrophil response

White blood cells are picky about sugar

July 11, 2007

Neutrophils recognize and respond to a particular form of sugar contained on the surface of pathogenic fungi.

Engineered yeast speeds ethanol production

December 7, 2006

Biofuels take a step toward the energy mainstream.

Image of yeast cells, some of which have undergone aberrant meiotic events

Scientists discover role for dueling RNAs

November 16, 2006

Researchers have found that a class of RNA molecules, previously thought to have no function, may in fact protect sex cells from self-destructing.

Pages

© Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research              455 Main Street          Cambridge, MA 02142