Tag: Page Lab

David Page elected to Institute of Medicine

October 13, 2008

Whitehead Director David C. Page has been elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM), one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine.

David Page elected Director of Whitehead Institute

December 8, 2005

The Whitehead Institute Board of Directors has announced that faculty Member David Page has been elected the fourth director of the Institute.

Human Y chromosome stays intact while chimp Y loses genes

August 31, 2005

The human and the chimpanzee Y chromosomes went their separate ways approximately 6 million years ago. But ever since this evolutionary parting, these two chromosomes have experienced different fates, ne research indicates.

Image: National Academy of Sciences logo

Whitehead Interim Director David Page named to National Academy of Sciences

May 4, 2005

Whitehead Institute Interim Director David Page is one of 72 new members of the National Academy of Sciences elected in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

David Page selected as interim director of Whitehead Institute

December 10, 2004

The Whitehead Institute Board of Directors has announced that David Page will be the interim director of the Institute, effective this month, December 2004.

Branching out

April 14, 2004

Whitehead biologist Steve Rozen has explored the family tree of the male-determing Y chromosome, looking for information about a genetic mutation that raises interesting questions about the evolution of the Y.

Whitehead Researchers Recognized for Scientific Contributions

November 18, 2003

The American Society of Human Genetics presented awards to Whitehead Member David Page and former graduate student Sjoerd Repping during its 53rd annual meeting, held recently in Los Angeles.

Illustration of chromosome

Rumors of Male Chromosome's Demise Greatly Exaggerated, Study Finds

June 18, 2003

In the biological battle between the sexes, the Y chromosome has suffered defeat after defeat. The male-determining chromosome has seen its gene supply shrink from more than 1,000 genes when sex chromosomes first evolved, to what scientists once thought was only a handful of genes, a downward trend predicted to continue until the Y disappeared altogether.

Scientists Sequence Male Infertility Region on Y Chromosome

November 16, 2001

In a tour de force in genomics, researchers led by the Whitehead Institute and the Washington University School of Medicine in St.Louis, Missouri, have sequenced and analyzed one of the most complicated terrains of the human genome. This region on the male sex (Y) chromosome, called AZFc, is important for sperm production and, when lost, causes male infertility.

The Masculinization of the X Chromosome: Many Genes for Early Male Sperm Production Reside on the X Chromosome

March 29, 2001

In an entirely counterintuitive result, scientists have found that nearly half of all genes related to the earliest stages of sperm production reside not on the male sex (Y) chromosome as expected, but on the X chromosome, a chromosome universally thought of as the female sex chromosome.

Men are not in Driver's Seat of Human Evolution

August 9, 2000

For more than half a century, the field of human genetics has harbored a gender bias about the relative contribution of males versus females to human evolution. Since 1947, when biologist J.B.S Haldane suggested that the rate of genetic mutation is much higher in the male germ line than in the female germ line, geneticists have credited males with much of the evolutionary changes that occurred in the 5 million years since human ancestors departed from chimpanzees.

Tracing the Evolution of Sex Chromosomes

October 29, 1999

Of the 46 human chromosomes, 44 are members of identical pairs. But two—the X and the Y—stand apart because they have no perfect match. Nevertheless, evolution has charged these two genetic loners with the critical task of sex determination: embryos with two X chromosomes develop into females, while embryos with an X and a Y chromosome develop into males.

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