Tag: Page Lab

Image of methylation in mouse embryos

Epigenetics: Chemical guideposts for gene expression

September 30, 2019

Whitehead Institute researchers investigate methylation, the chemical tags that help define gene expression during development and disease

Photo showing the bell curve of women's and men's heights

Genetic study takes sex differences research to new heights

July 18, 2019

Researchers find differences in gene expression between males and females throughout the body in humans and other mammals, including ones that contribute to the average height difference between the sexes

Illustration of egg with sperm swimming toward it

A troubling inheritance

April 9, 2019

Researchers have found that certain epigenetic changes in mice that appear to be inherited by offspring can lead to increased cancer rates

Immunofluorescence microscopy for meiotic markers in adult mouse testes

Start signal for sex cell creation

February 27, 2019

One protein is responsible for regulating a large network of genes that prompt cells to begin meiosis, the type of cell division that produces sex cells

Illustration of the Y chromosome

The Y Chromosome: Holding steadfast in a sea of change

August 2, 2018

The lab of Whitehead Member David Page has examined a series of regions on the Y chromosome called amplicons.

Image of mouse spermatocyte, which is the source of retinoic acid

Retinoic acid regulates transitions in mouse sperm production

November 7, 2017

Researchers swimming upstream in reproductive technology work now have important insights into sperm production

Detailed depiction of the structure of the mouse Y chromosome

What’s mighty about the mouse? For starters, its massive Y chromosome

October 30, 2014

An exhaustive effort to sequence the mouse Y chromosome reveals a surprisingly large and complex biological beast, at the same time providing remarkable insight into a heated battle for supremacy between mammalian sex chromosomes.

From liability to viability: Genes on the Y chromosome prove essential for male survival

April 23, 2014

The human Y chromosome has over the course of millions of years of evolution managed to preserve a small set of genes that has ensured not only its own survival but also the survival of men. Moreover, the vast majority of these tenacious genes appear to have little if any role in sex determination or sperm production. Taken together, these remarkable finding suggest that because these Y-linked genes are active across the body, they may actually be contributing to differences in disease susceptibility and severity observed between men and women.

Whitehead Institute and Biogen Idec logos

Whitehead Institute and Biogen Idec Initiate Discovery Research Collaboration

March 25, 2014

Whitehead Institute today announced it has entered into a scientific research collaboration with Biogen Idec aimed at driving early stage research that may lead to the development of novel therapies across a broad range of disease areas.

X chromosome

Sex chromosome shocker: The “female” X a key contributor to sperm production

July 21, 2013

Painstaking new analysis of the genetic sequence of the X chromosome—long perceived as the “female” counterpart to the male-associated Y chromosome—reveals that large portions of the X have evolved to play a specialized role in sperm production.

Electron micrograph of egg and sperm

Study reveals rate at which key genetic deletions contribute to male infertility

October 25, 2012

A large-scale analysis of Y chromosomes from more than 20,000 men finds that two spontaneously recurring deletions along a complex region of the Y chromosome are responsible for approximately 8% of cases of failed sperm production.

Whitehead Director talks Y chromosome with Stephen Colbert

March 27, 2012

Whitehead Institute Director David Page appeared last night on Comedy Central's The Colbert Report to engage in a little lively banter about the future of the human Y chromosome.

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