Tag: Page Lab

Image of mouse spermatocyte, which is the source of retinoic acid

Retinoic acid regulates transitions in mouse sperm production

November 7, 2017

Researchers swimming upstream in reproductive technology work now have important insights into sperm production

Detailed depiction of the structure of the mouse Y chromosome

What’s mighty about the mouse? For starters, its massive Y chromosome

October 30, 2014

An exhaustive effort to sequence the mouse Y chromosome reveals a surprisingly large and complex biological beast, at the same time providing remarkable insight into a heated battle for supremacy between mammalian sex chromosomes.

From liability to viability: Genes on the Y chromosome prove essential for male survival

April 23, 2014

The human Y chromosome has over the course of millions of years of evolution managed to preserve a small set of genes that has ensured not only its own survival but also the survival of men. Moreover, the vast majority of these tenacious genes appear to have little if any role in sex determination or sperm production. Taken together, these remarkable finding suggest that because these Y-linked genes are active across the body, they may actually be contributing to differences in disease susceptibility and severity observed between men and women.

Whitehead Institute and Biogen Idec logos

Whitehead Institute and Biogen Idec Initiate Discovery Research Collaboration

March 25, 2014

Whitehead Institute today announced it has entered into a scientific research collaboration with Biogen Idec aimed at driving early stage research that may lead to the development of novel therapies across a broad range of disease areas.

X chromosome

Sex chromosome shocker: The “female” X a key contributor to sperm production

July 21, 2013

Painstaking new analysis of the genetic sequence of the X chromosome—long perceived as the “female” counterpart to the male-associated Y chromosome—reveals that large portions of the X have evolved to play a specialized role in sperm production.

Electron micrograph of egg and sperm

Study reveals rate at which key genetic deletions contribute to male infertility

October 25, 2012

A large-scale analysis of Y chromosomes from more than 20,000 men finds that two spontaneously recurring deletions along a complex region of the Y chromosome are responsible for approximately 8% of cases of failed sperm production.

Whitehead Director talks Y chromosome with Stephen Colbert

March 27, 2012

Whitehead Institute Director David Page appeared last night on Comedy Central's The Colbert Report to engage in a little lively banter about the future of the human Y chromosome.

Image: Y and X chromosomes

Theory of the "rotting" Y chromosome dealt a fatal blow

February 22, 2012

Research on the evolution of the human Y chromosome confirms that the Y—despite arguments to the contrary—has a long, healthy future ahead of it.

Whitehead Institute Director honored with March of Dimes Prize

April 21, 2011

Whitehead Institute Director David Page has been named a recipient of the 2011 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. The prize honors Page’s groundbreaking body of research on the human Y chromosome.

X and Y chromosomes from a human male karyotype.

Chimp and human Y chromosomes evolving faster than expected

January 13, 2010

The first comprehensive comparison of Y chromosomes from two species sheds new light on Y chromosome evolution.  Contrary to a widely held scientific theory that the mammalian Y chromosome is slowly decaying or stagnating, new evidence suggests that in fact the Y is actually reinventing itself through continuous, wholesale renovation.

Schematic of crossing over between opposite arms of a palindrome

“Achilles’ heel” in Y chromosome linked to sex disorders

September 3, 2009

The unique mechanism behind the evolutionary survival of the human Y chromosome may also be responsible for a range of sex disorders, from failed sperm production to sex reversal to Turner Syndrome.

Cueing up at the meiotic starting line

December 11, 2008

Expression of the Dazl gene in embryonic germ cells primes these cells for stimulation by an external signal that initiates meiosis (the process of halving the cell’s chromosomes).

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