Tag: Lourido Lab

Image of small parasites infecting a larger host cell.

These genes help explain how malaria parasites survive treatment with common drug

September 23, 2020

Whitehead Institute Member Sebastian Lourido’s CRISPR screen technique reveals factors in parasites’ susceptibility to antibiotics

Parasite research heats up

July 5, 2020

Whitehead Institute researchers have used thermal profiling to match a potential antiparasitic drug to its target in Toxoplasma gondii, providing insight into the parasite’s calcium signaling pathways that could help in the development of therapeutics to treat infection.

Collage of people exercising in various ways for the GetFit competition

Beyond the Lab Bench: A Look at the Traditions That Make Whitehead Institute Unique

April 30, 2020

On the 4th floor of Whitehead Institute, scientists have found a unique way to cope with the rainy period of early spring — a competition where teams of eight try to exercise the most minutes. And it has helped a sizable part of the Whitehead community cope with social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How labs are weathering the lockdown

April 27, 2020

Labs are off-limits for most during the coronavirus pandemic. Here’s what Whitehead Institute scientists are doing to advance basic research, share their knowledge, and keep up morale in unprecedented times.

A Toxoplasma cyst isolated from a mouse brain. The cyst wall is stained green and the parasites are stained magenta.

Putting a finger on the switch of chronic parasite infection

January 16, 2020

Researchers at Whitehead Institute have discovered the master regulator necessary for the pervasive parasite Toxoplasma gondii to chronically infect its host. This finding provides important insights into the parasite’s biology and allows scientists in the laboratory to control if and when the parasite can differentiate into its chronic stage, which may inform research into prevention and treatment of infection.

Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) cells lose form and fail to replicate after degradation of GAPM proteins.

How one parasite stays in shape

January 23, 2019

Researchers in Whitehead Institute Member Sebastian Lourido’s lab identify the linchpin proteins of parasite Toxoplasma gondii’s cytoskeleton.

Toxoplasma gondii parasites

Parasite’s riff on essential enzyme highlights unique biology

September 18, 2018

In the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondiiWhitehead Member Sebastian Lourido studies, he has identified key components of the ATP synthase which differ from that of humans. These differences underscore the unique biology of T. gondii and highlight the dissimilarities between them and their human hosts.    

Whitehead Fellow Sebastian Lourido

Whitehead Fellow Sebastian Lourido speaks about proposed budget cuts

March 17, 2017

The budget proposed on March 15, 2017 would cut National Institutes of Health funding by an estimated 20 percent.

Sebastian Lourido appointed as a Member of Whitehead Institute and of the faculty of Massachusetts Institute of Technology

January 18, 2017

An emerging leader in investigations on deadly parasitic infections, Lourido’s appointment will further enhance one of the world’s most accomplished biomedical research institutes

Images of toxoplasma parasites inside of a host cell

Genome-wide Toxoplasma screen reveals mechanisms of parasitic infections

September 1, 2016

Whitehead Institute researchers have conducted the first genome-wide screen in Apicomplexa, a phylum of single-celled parasites that cause diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis. The screen sheds light into the vast, unstudied reaches of parasite genomes, uncovering for instance a protein common to all apicomplexans.

Illustration of DNA helices in tubes

Engineers design programmable RNA vaccines against Ebola, influenza

July 4, 2016

MIT and Whitehead Institute scientists have developed a new type of easily customizable vaccine that can be manufactured in one week, allowing it to be rapidly deployed in response to disease outbreaks. So far, they have designed vaccines against Ebola, H1N1 influenza, and Toxoplasma gondii (a relative of the parasite that causes malaria), which were 100 percent effective in tests in mice.

Three images of human lung cells were infected with influenza A virus.

Tiny alpaca-derived antibodies point to targets preventing viral infection

June 20, 2016

Using tiny, alpaca-derived, single-domain antibody fragments, Whitehead Institute scientists have developed a method to perturb cellular processes in mammalian cells, allowing them to tease apart the roles that individual proteins play in these pathways. With improved knowledge of protein activity, scientists can better understand not only basic biology but also how disease corrupts cellular function and identify potential therapeutics to rectify these aberrations.

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