Research

Research at Whitehead

Whitehead Institute provides researchers with the resources and freedom to follow their scientific instincts, form novel collaborations, and conduct high-risk research. While probing basic biological processes, the Institute’s 16 faculty Members and 2 Fellows develop innovative technologies and lay the foundation for projects that improve human health. They run pioneering programs in cancer, immunology, developmental biology, stem cell science, regenerative medicine, genetics, and genomics.

Members

 

Fellows

Research News

Implanting beads coated with Bradykinin peptides prevents the abnormal facial phenotypes seen after loss of function in kininogen, part of the Kinin-Kallikreien pathway.

July 17, 2014

A region and pathway found crucial for facial development in vertebrate embryos

A signaling pathway once thought to have little if any role during embryogenesis is a key player in the formation of the front-most portion of developing vertebrate embryos. Moreover, signals emanating from this region—referred to as the “extreme anterior domain” (EAD)—orchestrate the complex choreography that gives rise to proper facial structure.

Images of cells with normal and abnormal CENP-A deposition

July 17, 2014

Faithful cell division requires tightly controlled protein placement at the centromeres

The protein CENP-A, which is integrated into human DNA at the centromere on each chromosome, has a vital role in cell division. Work from Whitehead Institute Member Iain Cheeseman’s lab describes how the vital and tightly controlled replenishment of CENP-A progresses.

Human red blood cells supported on a glass slide.

June 30, 2014

Engineered red blood cells could carry precious therapeutic cargo

Whitehead Institute scientists have genetically and enzymatically modified red blood cells to carry a range of valuable payloads—from drugs, to vaccines, to imaging agents—for delivery to specific sites throughout the body.

Images of mouse lung cells untreated and treated with a PERK inhibitor

June 5, 2014

Seemingly invincible cancer stem cells reveal a weakness

Metastatic cancer cells, which can migrate from primary tumors to seed new malignancies, have thus far been resistant to the current arsenal of anticancer drugs. Now, however, researchers at Whitehead Institute have identified a critical weakness that actually exploits one of these cells’ apparent strengths—their ability to move and invade tissues. Their research could inform novel approaches to screening tumors for personalized therapy or to drugs that specifically target these cells.

Recent papers

July, 2014

Altered translation of GATA1 in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

Nat Med. 2014 Jul;20(7):748-53.


June 27, 2014

Efficient genome engineering of Toxoplasma gondii using CRISPR/Cas9.

PLoS One. 2014 Jun 27;9(6):e100450.


june 26, 2014

Translation of small open reading frames within unannotated RNA transcripts inSaccharomyces cerevisiae.

Cell Rep. 2014 Jun 26;7(6):1858-66.


All research papers

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