Research

Research at Whitehead

Whitehead Institute provides researchers with the resources and freedom to follow their scientific instincts, form novel collaborations, and conduct high-risk research. While probing basic biological processes, the Institute’s 16 faculty Members and 2 Fellows develop innovative technologies and lay the foundation for projects that improve human health. They run pioneering programs in cancer, immunology, developmental biology, stem cell science, regenerative medicine, genetics, and genomics.

Members

 

Fellows

Research News

Diagram of how Scr7 improves CRISPR/Cas

March 23, 2015

Refined CRISPR/Cas genome editing accelerates generation of transgenic mice

Although the genome editing system known as CRISPR/Cas has revolutionized genetic research in cell lines, its overall efficiency has been relatively poor when used to generate genetically altered animals for disease modeling.  Now Whitehead Institute scientists have altered the approach in a manner that could accelerate the production of mice carrying precise mutations of multiple genes.

Transmembrane protein SLC38A9 appears to act as a nutrients sensor for the mTORC1 metabolic pathway

January 7, 2015

Scientists identify first nutrient sensor in key growth-regulating metabolic pathway

Scientists in the lab of Whitehead Institute Member David Sabatini have for the first time identified a protein that appears to be a nutrient sensor for the key growth-regulating mTORC1 metabolic pathway. 

December 15, 2014

Family of neural-associated RNA-binding proteins found to regulate cell state in breast cancer

A widely conserved family of RNA-binding proteins known to be expressed in neural stem cells and other stem cell types has now been shown to play a role in controlling both the state and behavior of breast cancer cells.

Schematic depicting creation of stable induced neural stem cells (iNSCs)

November 6, 2014

Direct generation of neural stem cells could enable transplantation therapy

Induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) hold promise for therapeutic transplantation, but their potential in this capacity has been limited by failed efforts to maintain such cells in their multi-potent NSC state. Now, Whitehead Institute scientists have created iNSCs that remain in the multi-potent state—without ongoing expression of reprogramming factors. This allows the iNSCs to self-renew repeatedly to generate cells in quantities sufficient for therapy.

Recent papers

October 2, 2014

mRNA Destabilization Is the Dominant Effect of Mammalian MicroRNAs by the Time Substantial Repression Ensues.

Mol Cell. 2014 Oct 2;56(1):104-15.


October 1, 2014

Negative Self-Regulation of TLR9 Signaling by Its N-Terminal Proteolytic Cleavage Product.

J Immunol. 2014 Oct 1;193(7):3726-35.


October, 2014

Poised chromatin in the mammalian germ line.

Development. 2014 Oct;141(19):3619-26.


All research papers

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