Tag: Stem Cells + Therapeutic Cloning

With Respect and Conscience

October 23, 2003

In the heated debate over human embryo stem cell research, voices become muddled and motivations misunderstood. Scientist Willy Lensch is among those speaking out in support of this research. His reasons are complex, he says, but his cause is clear.

Faulty Reprogramming Likely Culprit behind Cloning Failures, Review Finds

July 16, 2003

Faulty reprogramming of the genome is most likely the culprit behind abnormalities common in cloned animals, according to a review article in the July 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Massachusetts Legislators Consider Bill on Stem Cell Research

May 7, 2003

Researchers at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research testified on Beacon Hill last week in support of a bill that would promote stem cell research in the Commonwealth. The bill, which mirrors a similar measure passed in California last year, would give a government seal of approval to embryonic stem (ES) cell research.

Inactive genes may contribute to failure of animals cloned from adult cells, study finds

March 20, 2003

Only 1 percent to 3 percent of animals cloned from adult cells survive to birth; many die mysteriously very early in development, around the time of implantation.

Scientists Show Cloning Leads to Severe Dysregulation of Many Genes

September 11, 2002

New results from Rudolf Jaenisch’s lab at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research confirmed that the cloning process jeopardizes the integrity of an animal’s whole genome. Scientists had suspected this based on studying a mere dozen genes, but the current study, which will be reported online in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science this week, expansively surveyed 10,000 genes for abnormalities.

Scientists Combine Therapeutic Cloning, Embryonic Stem Cells, and Gene Therapy to Correct a Genetic Defect in Mice

March 7, 2002

While the promise of nuclear transplantation therapy, commonly referred to as “therapeutic cloning,” has given hope to patients, like Christopher Reeve, and excited the research community and the public, it has never been successfully demonstrated.

New Study Shows Normal-Looking Clones May Be Abnormal

July 5, 2001

Scientists have found the first evidence to show that even seemingly normal-looking clones may harbor serious abnormalities affecting gene expression that may not manifest themselves as outward characteristics. The findings, reported in the July 6 issue of Science by researchers at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and University of Hawaii, confirm the previous suspicion that reproductive cloning is not only inefficient, but may actually be unsafe.

Scientists Track Down the Root of Cloning Problems

May 1, 2001

Despite technological advances, two major problems continue to plague the field of animal cloning: few clones survive to term and those that do are often grotesquely large. The root of these problems has remained a mystery until now.

Scientists Develop Most Efficient Mouse Cloning Strategy to Date, Create Transgenic Clone

January 31, 1999

Tetley is no ordinary mouse. And it's not just because he's a clone. Tetley is special because he was created using a new technology that researchers say has produced the most efficient results to date for cloning mice. He is also the first mouse clone whose genetic material was modified in the laboratory before cloning. The technology used to create Tetley, say researchers, will have a major impact on improving the efficiency of cloning in general.


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