Tag: Cancer

Researchers discover why melanoma is so malignant

September 5, 2005

Whitehead researchers discover that, unlike other cancers, melanoma is born with its metastatic engines fully revved.

Image: Tissue samples

Cancer exploits the body's wound-healing process, study finds

May 5, 2005

Scientists have known for the last decade that a link exists between wound healing and cancer. Now scientists in the lab of Whitehead Institute Member Robert Weinberg have discovered the process by which tumors hijack normal wound-healing processes and use them for their own purposes.

Researchers identify target for cancer drugs

February 14, 2005

For nearly a decade, scientists have been trying to fully understand a particular communication pathway inside of cells that contributes to many malignant brain and prostate cancers.

Images of cancer cells

New insight into cancer metastasis

June 24, 2004

Scientists know a great deal about how tumors originate and develop, but relatively little about how cancer manages to metastasize and invade distant tissues and organs.

Biography of a tumor

June 2, 2004

It starts out just like every other cell. There's nothing strange about it, no mutations, no odd behaviors—nothing that would distinguish it in any way from the countless cells with which it cohabits inside human tissue. Like all its neighbors, this cell multiplies only when it receives strict orders from its host tissue.

Study offers new model for breast cancer

March 22, 2004

The last few years have witnessed critical advances in breast cancer therapies. Still, the disease afflicts one in eight American women, and scientists have yet to develop a living model with which they can study the intricacies of human breast-tumor behavior. Now, a team in the lab of scientist Robert Weinberg at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research has successfully grafted human breast tissue into the mammary glands of mice.

Researchers Piece Together Cancer Puzzle

July 31, 2003

About four years ago, a group of Whitehead researchers created the first genetically engineered human cancer cells in the lab. They infected normal cells in mice with cancer-causing genes, and waited for tumors to form. Some cells formed large tumors, but others yielded only small, harmless bumps. What went wrong? they wondered. Or rather, What went right?

Process Triggered by Some Anti-Cancer Drugs Causes Tumors in Mice, Study Finds

April 17, 2003

It is well known that cancers frequently are caused by genetic mutations—random alterations along the long chain of molecules that make up the sequence of an organism's DNA. Two studies published this week in Science now point to another culprit in tumor formation

Screening Technique Streamlines Search for Anticancer Drug

March 25, 2003

Most cancer patients face an all or nothing dilemma. Aggressive chemotherapy can and often does kill cancerous cells, shrink tumors and increase a patient’s chance for survival. But chemo’s toxic chemicals kill healthy cells too, causing severe side effects like anemia, organ damage and even memory loss.

Researchers Develop Strategy to Predict Mutations Involved in Cancer Drug Resistance

March 20, 2003

Researchers have devised a way to identify genetic mutations that will cause resistance to targeted anti-cancer drugs, even before patients are treated – a finding that will aid scientists involved in drug development and allow physicians to monitor patients for resistance problems before they occur.

Vaccine Technology Homes in on Cancer

November 21, 2002

Whitehead Institute Member Richard Young's lab has discovered a unique approach to vaccine development, which is now in phase II and III human clinical trials for the cancer-causing human papilloma virus.

Scientists Find New Player in Cell Death Pathway

October 19, 2001

Research from Robert Weinberg’s lab at the Whitehead Institute has uncovered a much sought after piece of the puzzle of how cells use a protein called p53 to voluntarily die when the cell’s DNA is damaged. In fact, p53 is defective in 50% of human cancers allowing the cells to multiply despite DNA mutations.

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