Tag: Young Lab

Whitehead researchers named among Scientific American’s top 50

November 6, 2006

Whitehead Members Susan Lindquist and Richard Young, along with postdoctoral scientist Laurie Boyer, have been named in Scientific American magazine’s annual list of the world’s 50 top leaders in research, business or policy.

Laurie Boyer awarded Genzyme Fellowship

October 5, 2006

She will study how specific sets of genes are turned on or off in embryonic stem cells in order to permit cellular differentiation.

Diagram of kinase function

A deeper look at gene control

August 17, 2006

A well-known class of proteins may fill in the dotted lines that connect signal transduction pathways to the genes they regulate.

Mapping the foundation of human development

April 20, 2006

Researchers have determined how a key developmental ingredient controls the genome.

The grand challenge

November 9, 2005

What we don't know about human embryonic stem cells could fill labs all around the world.

Venn diagram

Researchers discover key to embryonic stem-cell potential

September 8, 2005

Researchers working with human embryonic stem cells have uncovered the process responsible for the single-most tantalizing characteristic of these cells: their ability to become just about any type of cell in the body, a trait known as pluripotency.

Researchers identify the genome’s controlling elements

September 1, 2004

Using yeast as a testing ground, Whitehead researchers have for the first time revealed all the “controlling elements” of an entire genome—findings that may soon contribute to a new way of understanding human health and disease.

The big picture

July 14, 2004

For years, scientists have studied the human genome one gene at a time. Today, their view is more global, a vantage point that offers a new look at how genes and proteins work together to produce living cells and organisms.

New genomics tool boosts diabetes research

February 26, 2004

Researchers have developed a method for scanning the entire human genome to successfully map the location of key gene regulators, mutated forms of which are known to cause type 2 diabetes. The research marks the first time that human organshave been analyzed in this way and opens the door to similar studies.

Scientists Work to Break Cellular Code

November 6, 2003

Despite the rich knowledge scientists now have of the genes that constitute the human genome, researchers have yet to unravel the precise choreography by which they work – or malfunction – together in the cell in response to triggers from the outside world.

New Computer Method Advances Systems Biology

October 14, 2003

A team of researchers from Whitehead Institute and MIT have developed a new computational method that will give a boost to the field of systems biology.

Studies Shed Light on Gene Response to Bacterial Infections

July 24, 2003

Making a medical diagnosis today often relies on symptomology, bacterial cultures, stain tests, experience – and luck. But new research by systems biologists at Whitehead aims to offer physicians new diagnostic tools by uncovering important differences in the way immune cells respond to bacteria.

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