Tag: Sabatini Lab

Leucine deprivation proves deadly to malignant melanoma cells

May 16, 2011

Whitehead Institute researchers have found that depriving human melanoma cells of the amino acid leucine can be lethal to the cells, suggesting a possible strategy for therapeutic intervention. The researchers observed the effect in melanoma cells with a mutation in the RAS/MEK signaling pathway—the most common mutation found in the deadliest form of skin cancer.

Mammalian aging process linked to overactive cellular pathway

December 22, 2010

Whitehead Institute researchers have linked hyperactivity in the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) cellular pathway to reduced ketone production in the liver, which is a well-defined physiological trait of aging in mice.

Yasemin Sancak receives Harold M. Weintraub Award

March 11, 2010

Yasemin Sancak, a researcher in the lab of Whitehead Member David Sabatini, has received a 2010 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award, which honors outstanding biology graduate students for the quality, originality, and significance of their work.

Whitehead Member David Sabatini receives Paul Marks Prize

September 29, 2009

Whitehead Institute Member David Sabatini has been awarded the Paul Marks Prize for Cancer Research in recognition of his discovery of a key pathway regulating cell growth and survival.

Multiple myeloma cells get what they want

May 27, 2009

Researchers at Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research have identified a protein in multiple myeloma cells, called DEPTOR, that indirectly activates a signaling pathway commonly turned on in cancer cells. Known as the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway, this signaling pathway controls cell survival, and when altered, keeps cancer cells from dying.

Cell pathway on overdrive prevents cancer response to dietary restriction

March 11, 2009

Whitehead Institute researchers have pinpointed a cellular pathway that determines whether cancerous tumors are susceptible to dietary restriction during their development. When this pathway, known as PI3K is permanently turned “on” via mutation, tumors grow and proliferate independent of the amount of food consumed. However, when the PI3K pathway operates normally, tumors respond to dietary restriction—defined as food consumption limited to 60% of normal--and become smaller in size.

Slides of prostate cells

Preventing prostate cancer the complex way

February 2, 2009

Blocking a specific protein complex (mTORC2) prevents prostate tumor formation in mice with a deleted PTEN gene. Inhibition of this complex in normal prostate cells, however, appears to have no effect, suggesting that the protein complex may be a future target for drug development.

Whitehead Member David Sabatini wins HHMI appointment

May 27, 2008

Sabatini has been appointed a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator, a highly sought-after post that recognizes the nation’s top biomedical scientists.

How cells size up their growth opportunities

May 22, 2008

Improved understanding of this nutrient-sensing pathway may aid in developing therapies for cancer and diabetes.

Whitehead’s Sabatini named “Distinguished Young Scholar” by W.M. Keck Foundation

July 13, 2005

Whitehead Associate Member David Sabatini has been chosen by the W.M. Keck Foundation as one of this year’s grant recipients under the Distinguished Young Scholars in Medical Research program.

Image: Microarry results

Array for the cell

May 25, 2005

Figuring what a gene does is hard work, but it’s vastly easier than it was a few years ago. Back then, you would laboriously isolate a single gene, tinker with it to get some inkling about its purpose, and then start speculating about how it might collaborate with other genes. Now, microarrays let researchers gather exponentially more data about gene expression.

RNAi Consortium to accelerate genetic research

March 16, 2005

Whitehead Institute has joined ten other leading biomedical organizations in an $18 million, three-year public-private consortium that will create a comprehensive library of gene inhibitors to be made available to the entire scientific community.

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