Tag: Sabatini Lab

The FLCN-FNIP-Rag-Ragulator complex

Whitehead team solves structure of key mTORC1 activator

November 5, 2019

Findings shed light on the mechanics of mTORC1 signaling, lay the foundation for drug discovery 

Image of structure of the raptor - rag - ragulator protein comples

Whitehead Institute team resolves structure of master growth regulator

October 10, 2019

New paper in Science reveals how mTORC1 docks at lysosomal surface  


Photo of Whitehead Institute Postdoc Izabella Pena

Whitehead Institute Postdoc Izabella Pena Selected as a 2019 Pew Latin American Fellow

June 10, 2019

Pena, who hails from Brazil, studies in Whitehead Institute Member David Sabatini's lab how cells calibrate their growth, metabolism, and proliferation based on nutrient availability 

Representation of the Zika virus's surface

How to be a good host (for Zika virus)

April 22, 2019

Using a genome-wide CRISPR screen in neural progenitor cells, Whitehead Institute scientists uncover what the Zika virus needs to infect human cells

Illustration of woman shooting at a cancer monster

Sharpening the edges of cancer chemotherapy

July 11, 2018

Whitehead team deploys CRISPR tools to better understand and uncover ways of improving methotrexate, a popular chemotherapy drug.

Image of GATOR1 structure

Structure of key growth regulator revealed

March 28, 2018

Researchers solve molecular structure of GATOR1 complex using cryo-electron microscopy

Illustration of scientist opening a cell and looking at a molecule

Key nutrient sensor identified for cellular pathway linking nutrient availability to cell growth

November 9, 2017

Whitehead Member David Sabatini has identified the methionine sensor in the mTOR pathway, which is a crucial metabolic pathway in cells. His work provides interesting data suggesting that the anti-aging and anti-diabetes effects of low methionine and mTOR inhibition may be connected.

Illustration of scientist measuring a cell on a scale

Study reveals key molecular link in major cell growth pathway

October 19, 2017

A team of scientists led by Whitehead Institute has uncovered a surprising molecular link that connects how cells regulate growth with how they sense and make available the nutrients required for growth.  The researchers’ findings also implicate a new protein, SLC38A9, as a potential drug target in pancreatic cancer. 

Growth medium based on human plasma rewires cell metabolism

April 6, 2017

Cultured human cells are the foundation for disease and drug research. Now Whitehead Institute researchers have designed a growth medium that more closely resembles the cells’ environment in the body—and demonstrated that, relative to decades-old recipes that have remained the workhorses of cell culture studies, it significantly alters the cells’ inner workings.

Whitehead Member David Sabatini

Whitehead Member David Sabatini awarded Foundation for the NIH Lurie Prize in Biomedical Sciences

April 4, 2017

Prize bestowed for discovery of the mTOR pathway’s impact on age-related diseases

Researchers chart global genetic interaction networks in human cancer cells

February 2, 2017

Investigators at Whitehead Institute and the Broad Institute have succeeded in identifying the set of essential genes—those required for cellular proliferation and survival—in each of 14 human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines that had previously been characterized by genome sequencing. By combining their “gene essentiality map” with the existing genomic information, their study revealed liabilities in genetically defined subset of cancers that could be exploited for new therapies.

Microscope images of mitochondria

Novel method enables absolute quantification of mitochondrial metabolites

August 31, 2016

Whitehead Institute scientists have developed a method to quickly isolate mitochondria from mammalian cells and systematically measure the concentrations of mitochondrial metabolites. Mitochondrial dysfunction is found in several disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, cardiovascular disease, and mitochondrial diseases. Until now, peering into the inner metabolic workings of these vital organelles has been very challenging.

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