Tag: Ploegh Lab

Human red blood cells supported on a glass slide.

Engineered red blood cells could carry precious therapeutic cargo

June 30, 2014

Whitehead Institute scientists have genetically and enzymatically modified red blood cells to carry a range of valuable payloads—from drugs, to vaccines, to imaging agents—for delivery to specific sites throughout the body.

Image showing uninfected B cells and B cells infected with influenza

Flu virus wipes out immune system’s first responders to establish infection

October 19, 2013

Revealing influenza’s truly insidious nature, Whitehead Institute scientists have discovered that the virus is able to infect its host by first killing off the cells of the immune system that are actually best equipped to neutralize the virus.

Representation of MHV-68

Modified antibodies trigger immune response, point to novel vaccine design strategies

January 7, 2013

In an approach with the potential to aid therapeutic vaccine development, Whitehead Institute scientists have shown that enzymatically modified antibodies can be used to generate highly targeted, potent responses from cells of the immune system.

Logo of NIH Director's Pioneer Award

Whitehead Member to receive NIH grant for "high-risk, high-reward" research

September 13, 2012

Whitehead Institute Member Hidde Ploegh has been named a recipient of a 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s Pioneer Award, intended to accelerate the pursuit of potentially groundbreaking research.

Novel method could improve the performance of proteins used therapeutically

March 9, 2011

Whitehead Institute scientists have created a method that uses the enzyme sortase A to site-specifically modify proteins. Using this technique, researchers were able to increase potency, slow the metabolism, and improve thermal stability of several proteins.

Whitehead Member Hidde Ploegh honored for immunology research

January 24, 2011

The American Association of Immunologists has named Whitehead Institute Member Hidde Ploegh the recipient of its 2011 Meritorious Career Award.

New model tracks the immune response to a T

April 8, 2010

Using T cells primed for the infectious disease toxoplasmosis, Whitehead Institute researchers have created novel mouse models of the immune system that more accurately reflect how immune cells actually respond to pathogens in their presence.

Schematic of YOD1's role

Jamming cell’s protein disposal shows how system works

October 26, 2009

Whitehead Institute scientists have determined that a protein known as YOD1 plays a critical role in the disposal of misfolded cellular proteins. The researchers identified YOD1’s role by blocking its function, a manipulation that halts the elimination of errant proteins entirely. The finding should help bring greater understanding to this vital but complex cellular process.

Scientists pinpoint immune system targets in complex pathogens

December 5, 2008

Scientists have long struggled for details on how the immune system responds to complex pathogens such as the parasite Toxoplasma gondii and herpes viruses. Adapting an existing technology, researchers have pinpointed precise molecular targets that these pathogens present to signal T cells.

Schematic of microengraved slide use

Protein-printing technique gives snapshots of immune system defense

November 3, 2008

A new technique lets researchers, for the first time, look at single white blood cells and measure specific characteristics of the set of antibodies they produce when the body is under attack.

Gijsbert Grotenbreg is named NRF Research Fellow

February 15, 2008

Postdoc will receive up to $1.5 million for independent research in Singapore.

Schematic showing the electron density of the herpes-specific protein m48

New drug target for herpes viruses?

March 8, 2007

Researchers have solved the complex structure of a recently discovered protein that is found in a wide range of herpes viruses.

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