Tag: Orr-Weaver Lab

Diagram of how the control of the translation of mRNAs into proteins shifts as the egg becomes an the embryo

Elegant switch controls translation in transition from egg to embryo

June 14, 2017

The transition from an egg to a developing embryo is one of life’s most remarkable transformations. Now Whitehead Institute researchers have used fruit flies to decipher how one aspect—control of the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) into proteins—shifts as the egg becomes an the embryo.  This type of switch could tell scientists more about how human cells work and embryos develop.

Forks colliding: How DNA breaks during re-replication

June 4, 2015

Leveraging a novel system designed to examine the double-strand DNA breaks that occur as a consequence of gene amplification during DNA replication, Whitehead Institute scientists are bringing new clarity to the causes of such genomic damage. Moreover, because errors arising during DNA replication and gene amplification result in chromosomal abnormalities often found in malignant cells, these new findings may bolster our understandings of certain drivers of cancer progression.

Blocking a fork in the road to DNA replication

October 30, 2014

A team of Whitehead Institute scientists has discovered the surprising manner in which an enigmatic protein known as SUUR acts to control gene copy number during DNA replication. It’s a finding that could shed new light on the formation of fragile genomic regions associated with chromosomal abnormalities.  

Graphic summary

Lost in translation? Not when it comes to control of gene expression during Drosophila development

May 29, 2014

The lab of Whitehead Member Terry Orr-Weaver has conducted perhaps the most comprehensive look yet at changes in translation and protein synthesis during a developmental change, using the oocyte-to-embryo transition in Drosophila as a model system. One of the insights from this research is that a surprisingly large number of mRNAs that are translationally regulated.

Image of a larval fruit fly brain

Brain glia cells increase their DNA content to preserve vital blood-brain barrier

January 13, 2012

Whitehead Institute scientists report that the growing fruit fly brain instructs subperineurial glia (SPG) cells that form the blood-brain barrier to enlarge by creating multiple copies of their genomes in a process known as polyploidization.

Whitehead Member Terry Orr-Weaver named AAAS Fellow

January 12, 2011

Whitehead Institute Member Terry Orr-Weaver has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Terry Orr-Weaver receives American Cancer Society award

October 2, 2006

The appointment highlights the importance of conducting basic research on model organisms to elucidate key processes in human cells.

Terry Orr-Weaver named to National Academy of Sciences

April 26, 2006

Whitehead Member Terry Orr-Weaver is one of 72 new members of the National Academy of Sciences.

Image: Function of MEI-S332

When cells divide

April 27, 2005

Cells are dividing all the time, and that’s a good thing. If they didn’t, our tissue and organs couldn’t replenish themselves, and pretty soon we’d be done for. But when cell division goes wrong, it can have disastrous results, such as cancer and birth defects. Scientists in the lab of Whitehead Member Terry Orr-Weaver have uncovered one of the primary mechanisms governing cell division.

Studies Examine Development in Drosophila

February 11, 2004

Two studies by scientists in the lab of Whitehead Member Terry Orr-Weaver that shed light on developmental strategies of Drosophila were published in recent issues of the journals Developmental Cell and Current Biology.

Whitehead scientist named president of Genetics Society of America

January 28, 2004

Whitehead Member Terry Orr-Weaver has been elected president of the Genetics Society of America, a nonprofit scientific organization whose members specialize in genetic studies.

Study Identifies Protein Complex Critical in Rapid Embryogenesis

December 11, 2003

For scientists who study embryonic development, insects, amphibians and marine invertebrates provide a unique window on the early stages of an embryo’s life. These organisms differ from higher life forms by having a simpler system for cell division, but it’s a system on fast forward: The embryos receive a maternal care package that permits their DNA replication and chromosome segregation to go into overdrive.

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