News Archive

 

Jaenisch Named to National Academy of Sciences

April 29, 2003

Founding Whitehead Institute Member Rudolf Jaenisch is one of 72 new members of the National Academy of Sciences elected in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

Illustration showing the many factors impacting the protein complex (Raptor, mTOR and GßL) that orchestrates cell growth.

Researchers Find New Piece of Cell Growth Puzzle

April 29, 2003

Spurred by the discover of a cellular pathway that helps switch cell growth on and off, new research links growth to a cell's ability to sense nutrients in its environments.

Lydia Villa-Komaroff among 50 Most Important Hispanics in Business and Technology

April 22, 2003

Lydia Villa-Komaroff, vice president and chief operating officer for Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, has been selected as one of this country’s most powerful Hispanic executives in technology and business by “Hispanic Engineer & Information Technology” magazine.

Process Triggered by Some Anti-Cancer Drugs Causes Tumors in Mice, Study Finds

April 17, 2003

It is well known that cancers frequently are caused by genetic mutations—random alterations along the long chain of molecules that make up the sequence of an organism's DNA. Two studies published this week in Science now point to another culprit in tumor formation

Diagram of a miRNA

Novel Method IDs “Hidden Genes”

April 17, 2003

Once thought to serve only as a bridge between genes and protein production, RNA is quickly shedding its reputation as being all brawn and no brain. RNA’s research renaissance is due in part to the recent discovery of a new class of genes called microRNAs (miRNAs). Rather than code for proteins, miRNAs serve as regulators—genetic trump cards that turn protein-coding genes off.

International Consortium Completes Human Genome Project

April 14, 2003

The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium, led in the United States by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) and the Department of Energy (DOE), today announced the successful completion of the Human Genome Project more than two years ahead of schedule.

Whitehead/MIT Genome Center Researchers Assemble Draft Sequence of Aspergillus nidulans

April 9, 2003

The Whitehead Institute/MIT Center for Genome Research this week announced the public release of a high quality draft genome sequence of Aspergillus nidulans, a mold, or filamentous fungus commonly used in laboratory research to study important questions in genetics and cell biology.

Eric Lander Named Scientist of the Year

April 3, 2003

Eric Lander, a member of Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Cambridge, Mass., has been named “Scientist of the Year” by the National Disease Research Interchange in recognition of his leadership in the field of genomic research and development.

Kevin Eggan Wins Harold M . Weinbtraub Grad Student Award

April 2, 2003

Sixteen graduate students from North America and Europe, including Kevin Eggan of the Jaenisch lab, have been selected to receive the 2003 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award, which is sponsored by the Basic Sciences Division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

Prions Offer Nanotech Building Tool

March 31, 2003

The same characteristics that make misfolded proteins known as prions such a pernicious medical threat in neurodegenerative diseases may offer a construction toolkit for manufacturing nanoscale electrical circuits, researchers report this week in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Screening Technique Streamlines Search for Anticancer Drug

March 25, 2003

Most cancer patients face an all or nothing dilemma. Aggressive chemotherapy can and often does kill cancerous cells, shrink tumors and increase a patient’s chance for survival. But chemo’s toxic chemicals kill healthy cells too, causing severe side effects like anemia, organ damage and even memory loss.

Inactive genes may contribute to failure of animals cloned from adult cells, study finds

March 20, 2003

Only 1 percent to 3 percent of animals cloned from adult cells survive to birth; many die mysteriously very early in development, around the time of implantation.

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