News Archive

 

Emerald City: How a jellyfish helped advance science

September 15, 2004

Salmon fishermen trolling along the waters off Puget Sound in Washington are often witness to an awesome sight when they haul in their catch: salmon captured in nets that glow brilliantly against the nighttime sky.

Sperm cells “spring” into action

September 8, 2004

Scientists have identified a surprising mechanical means by which cells store and release energy, a tightly wound jack-in-the-box mechanism rather than the chemical storehouse cells are known to use.

Researchers identify the genome’s controlling elements

September 1, 2004

Using yeast as a testing ground, Whitehead researchers have for the first time revealed all the “controlling elements” of an entire genome—findings that may soon contribute to a new way of understanding human health and disease.

Rett Syndrome Research Foundation commits funding to support Matthew Tudor

August 25, 2004

Matthew Tudor, postdoc in the lab of Whitehead Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch, is among 15 awardees of research and education suport from The Rett Syndrome Research Foundation (RSRF) for 2004.

Prions act as stepping stones in evolution

August 18, 2004

When a protein misfolds, the results can be disastrous. An incorrect change in the molecule’s shape can lead to diseases including Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s. But scientists have discovered that misfolded proteins can have a positive side in yeast.

Protein targeted by drug developers not open and shut case

August 11, 2004

Discovery of the mTOR protein and the role it plays in cell growth, a process often linked to diseases such as cancer, was part serendipity and part good detective work. And like any good whodunit, the mTOR story wouldn’t be complete without an unexpected twist.

Malignant cancer cells generate mice through cloning

August 8, 2004

Nature can reset the clock in certain types of cancer and reverse many of the elements responsible for causing malignancy, reports a research team led by Whitehead Institute Member Rudolf Jaenisch, in collaboration with Lynda Chin from Dana Farber Cancer Institute. The team demonstrated this by successfully cloning mice from an advanced melanoma cell.

Susan Lindquist elected to Germany’s top scientific academy

July 28, 2004

Whitehead Institute Director Susan Lindquist has been elected a member of Deutsche Akademie Der Naturforscher Leopoldina, the oldest scientific academy in Germany.

Picture perfect

July 21, 2004

A new microscope at the Whitehead/MIT Bioimaging Center will show the smallest molecules at near-atomic scale. Placing the microscope in a climate-controlled room helps stabilize easily perturbed electrons, thus improving image quality.

The big picture

July 14, 2004

For years, scientists have studied the human genome one gene at a time. Today, their view is more global, a vantage point that offers a new look at how genes and proteins work together to produce living cells and organisms.

Will the UN beat the ban?

July 7, 2004

For stem cell research, this was a “Who’s Who?” gathering. Those taking the stage at United Nations headquarters in New York included Whitehead Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch; Douglas Melton of Harvard University; Roslin Institute’s Ian Wilmut, the Scottish embryologist who cloned Dolly; and Seoul National University’s Shin Yong Moon, who culled embryonic stem cells from the cloned human blastocyst earlier this year.

Researchers discover receptor molecule for key diabetes protein

June 30, 2004

Obesity researchers made an intriguing discovery in 2001 when they found that large doses of a particular fat-cell protein, adiponectin, caused obese mice to lose weight.

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